Kyiv, Ukraine. On 9 November 2006 the global Human Development Report “Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis” was launched in Ukraine and many other countries worldwide. b_92_52_16777215_00_images_content_news_803.jpg Kyiv, Ukraine. On 9 November 2006 the global Human Development Report “Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis” was launched in Ukraine and many other countries worldwide.
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Kyiv, Ukraine. On 9 November 2006 the global Human Development Report “Beyond Scarcity: Power, Poverty and the Global Water Crisis” was launched in Ukraine and many other countries worldwide.

The authors report that more then 2.6 billion people still lack access to proper sanitation and 1.1 billion people have no regular access to clean water. As a result, each year 1.8 million children die from diarrhoea and 443 million school days are lost to water-related illness. Since water “stress” faces primarily the poor parts of any society, sanitation and water provision are rarely on top of political agenda and in the centre of interest of government decision makers.

At the press-conference in Kyiv the report was presented by the Deputy Resident Representative of UNDP Ms. Joanna Kazana-Wisniowiecka together with the representatives of the State Committee of Ukraine of Water Management, State Statistics Committee of Ukraine and Research Institute of Water Resources.

“As report shows, across the world unclean water is an immeasurably greater threat to human security than violent conflicts”, stated Ms. Joanna Kazana-Wisniowiecka opening the launch. “United Nations Development Programme is working in Ukraine to support state bodies and local communities in solving the problem of access to water. In Crimea, we have concrete models that could be replicated nation-wide. The UN works also to strengthen cross-border cooperation on water resources”, she emphasized.

UNDP’s latest Human Development Index was also released today as part of the 2006 Human Development Report. After a costly setback in human development in the first half of the 1990s, Central and Eastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States have recovered strongly. The Index analyses 2004 statistics from UN member countries and assesses the state of human development through life expectancy; adult literacy; and income based on the most recent reliable data.

Ukraine’s rank is 77 compared to 78 in the last year Human Development Report. The countries at the top and bottom of the ranking are unchanged from the 2005 HDR: Norway is ranked 1, while Niger is 177, the last of the countries for which sufficient information is available.

This day the presentation of UNDP Human Development Report 2006 was delivered to the students studying ecology and economics in the Kyiv Mohyla Academy.

Photo report from the HDR Launch in Kyiv is available here.

The press-clipping from the national launch could be viewed here. The interview of UNDP Ukraine Resident Representative Mr. Francis O'Donnell to the RTE news is available here.

The copies of the Human Development Report 2006 in Russian and English could be obtained from UNDP Ukraine office (1 Klovsky Uzviz, Kyiv) or downloaded from the web-site: http://hdr.undp.org/hdr2006/report.cfm .

For more information please contact Ms. Veronika VASHCHENKO at +38 044 253 9363 or by e-mail: veronika.vashchenko@undp.org .

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The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy. The goal was both massive and simple, with far-ranging implications - going beyond income to assess the level of people's long-term well-being. The Human Development Report is an independent report commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). The Report is translated into more than a dozen languages and launched in more than 100 countries annually. More information: http://hdr.undp.org .